Podium Presentation

Tuesday, January 24th

3:40 PM – 4:00 PM

Track 1, Metabolomics of Large Sample Cohorts
Mojave Learning Center

Development of a High-Throughput Information Rich LC-MS Platform for Large Cohort Epidemiology & Biomedical Research Studies

Robert Plumb, Director of Metabolic Profiling
Waters Corporation

The detection, identification and validation of biomarkers for biomedical research and discovery requires a robust, reliable and information rich analytical platform. Metabolic Phenotyping of large cohort epidemiological and pre-clinical studies provides a metabolic insight into disease mechanism, treatment efficacy and toxicity. Analysis of these large cohort batches by UHPLC-MS is time consuming and often results in batch to batch variations due to subtle analytical batch variation. A high-throughput microbore UPLC-MS method has been developed providing an analytical platform for the metabolic phenotyping of biofluids from large sample cohorts. This approach has demonstrated high throughput reproducibility and the ability to identify biomarkers of toxicity.

Poster Presentations

Tuesday, January 24th

4:00 PM

Topic: Tissue Imaging & Analysis
Poster # 25A:
A Fully Automated DESI Imaging Platform – from Slide Loading to Data Processing. 3D Tissue Imaging or Large Sample Cohort Studies with Minimal User Input.

Emrys Jones
Waters Corporation

In order to maximize the potential of imaging mass spectrometry, integrated workflows and automation will be key requirements for the uptake of the technique by non-expert users. With advances in acquisition software, tissue object identification, data directed methodologies and robotics, a full 3D imaging data set from serial sections or a large cohort of samples can be analyzed and processed with minimal interaction from the user. Here we introduce a DESI system for research use which combines a commercially available source with an automated slide loader for high throughput mass spectrometry imaging.

Wednesday, January 25th

9:45 AM

Poster # 23B:
LC-MS/MS Analysis of Urinary Benzodiazepines and Z-Drugs via a Simplified, Mixed-Mode Sample Preparation Strategy for Clinical Research.

Jonathan Danaceau
Waters Corporation

Benzodiazepines are commonly prescribed drugs used for their sedative, anxiolytic, and hypnotic properties. So-called “Z-drugs” (zolpidem and zopiclone) are commonly used sleep aids that act in a similar manner to benzodiazepines. This method analyzes 18 benzodiazepine drugs and metabolites, along with zolpidem, zopiclone and N-desmethyl zopiclone. Strong cation exchange micro elution plates were used to rapidly extract these compounds from urine samples. All sample preparation steps, including enzymatic hydrolysis, were performed within the wells of μElution plates, eliminating sample transfer steps, and the extraction method is simplified by eliminating conditioning and equilibration. Quantitative results were accurate and precise for all analytes across the entire calibration range.

Wednesday, January 25th

5:00 PM

Poster # 17C:
LC-MS/MS Analysis of Angiotensin I for Assessment of Plasma Renin Activity in Clinical Research.

Dominic Foley
Waters Corporation

We have developed a LC-MS/MS method for the measurement of angiotensin I as a marker of plasma renin activity (PRA) for clinical research activities involving biomarkers of hypertension. Following incubation of plasma samples for 3 hours at 37°C, an offline automated sample preparation method was performed using µElution Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) in 96-well plate format, reducing sample preparation time and optimizing analytical sensitivity. This offline automated method demonstrates good linearity, precision, and accuracy, while providing high sample throughput and sample tracking capabilities. For Research Use Only, Not for use in diagnostic procedures.

Wednesday, January 25th

5:00 PM

Poster # 22C:
Quantitative Analysis of THC and Related Cannabinoids in Multiple Matrices Using a Solid Phase Extraction Sorbent with UPLC/MS/MS for Clinical Research.

Kim Haynes
Waters Corporation

Cannabis continues to be a highly abused recreational drug. In addition, the increasing number of states legalizing it for medical use, combined with the trend towards legalization for recreational purposes means than analytical methods for the quantification of Ä-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), its metabolites and related cannabinoids continue to be necessary. Matrix effects can be a challenge and can vary significantly in different biological matrices. This work uses a novel reversed-phase solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbent, which has been developed to enable simpler and faster SPE protocols. 3 step load-wash-elute SPE protocols, eliminating conditioning and equilibration, were successfully employed to extract THC, OH-THC and COOH-THC from multiple matrices, including plasma, oral fluid, whole blood and urine, followed by direct analysis by UPLC/MS/MS.

Wednesday, January 25th

5:00 PM

Poster # 19C:
True Distribution of Isobaric N-Glycans Separated by Ion Mobility Directly from FFPE Colon Cancer Tissue by MALDI Imaging.

Emmanuelle Claude
Waters Corporation

Research studies have reported extensive alterations in protein glycosylation patterns in cancer tissues, like in colon cancer which is the third most common cancer in the United States. However during these studies, tissues are homogenized and the spatial information showing the localization of the glycans is lost. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), can accurately determine the spatial location of molecules in a tissue section. Recently, methods have been developed to determine released N-Glycans directly from tissues. A major challenge in the analysis of N-glycans is the large number of isobaric glycans resulting from their complex structures with branched chains and multiple additions residues. Here we report the ability of ion mobility separation to differentiate isobaric N-glycans in a MALDI MSI workflow used for the analysis of human FFPE colon cancer tissue.

Wednesday, January 25th

5:00 PM

Poster # 21C:
Sensitive and Reproducible LC-MS Quantification of C-Reactive Protein in Plasma for Clinical Research.

Laks Iyer
Waters Corporation

The ability to detect and quantify plasma C-Reactive Protein (CRP) as a marker of inflammation is of high interest. For LC-MS protein quantification, enzymatic digestion and analysis of resulting peptides is often employed. These workflows are complex and laborious, with enzymatic digestion’s often taking 24 hours to achieve sensitive and accurate quantification. This work describes a total workflow that can be completed in